Montana State University

Chemical & Biological Engineering Department

Montana State University
306 Cobleigh Hall
PO Box 173920 Bozeman, MT 59717-3920

Tel: (406) 994-2221
Fax: (406) 994-5308
E-mail: ChBE@coe.montana.edu
Location: 306 Cobleigh Hall

Department Head:

Jeff Heys, Ph.D.

Welcome to Chemical and Biological Engineering!

Our goal is to prepare students to use their knowledge and skills to contribute to society and their profession. We offer undergraduate degrees in both chemical engineering and bioengineering.

The basis of both chemical and biological engineering is the useful transformation of matter from one form to another. That transformation can be brought about by direct chemical reactions, or chemical reactions mediated by living organisms.

Right now, chemical and biological engineers can work in many of the same areas. That may change as bioengineering develops as a profession, but bioengineers are likely to work closely with chemical engineers for the foreseeable future.

Students share their stories

Students talk about what makes MSU unique. Hear about their plans for the future and how they anticipate that chemical engineers will improve people's lives, especially through medical and environmental applications.

Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering overlap

Both chemical and biological engineers are working with

  • Novel materials
  • Food products
  • Energy sources
  • Pharmaceuticals

The list is expanding all the time - tomorrow's graduates may find careers in fields that do not even exist today as chemical and biological engineering research continually expands the opportunities.

If you haven’t decided whether you want a career in chemical or biological engineering, take heart - the curricula for chemical engineering and bioengineering are identical for the first three semesters.

In the first three semesters the focus is on basic math and science courses, and both bioengineers and chemical engineers need chemistry, calculus, and physics. The curricula start diverging in the junior year when bioengineering majors take more bio-based science courses while chemical engineering majors take more engineering courses.